Best Cleaning Tips to Make Your House Look Like New

Spring is here, which means you have no excuses: It’s officially time to clean your entire house (say, spring cleaning?). If you don’t know where to start, work your way through these tried-and-tested cleaning tips from the Good Housekeeping Institute Cleaning Lab to add sparkle and shine to any (and every!) room. It’s up to you: Take things room by room, or tackle one small appliance at a time until everything is free of grime, mildew, dust, and whatever else is making it look — and feel — dirty. When all is said and done, your kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, and every other corner in your home will look just like new. Grab your rubber gloves, start cleaning, and you’ll see what we’re talking about.

Remove build-up in your humidifier.

Think about it: The water that makes your humidifier run smoothly is also breeding ground for mold and microbes. To clean, pour two cups of undiluted white vinegar into the water tank and swish it around until wet. Place the vinegar-filled tank on the base and allow it to drain into the reservoir for 15 – 20 minutes. Empty it and use a small brush to scrub crevices, removing remaining build-up.

Restore your dishwasher.

Over time, excess food and grime will build up in your dishwasher’s interior. Get in the habit of cleaning any remaining bits of foods — beans, pasta, and so on — after each dishwashing cycle. Pull out the bottom rack to look for any leftover food and remove it with a paper towel to prevent future odors.

Scrub your toilet clean.

Apply a toilet bowl cleaner, and let it sit for up to five minutes before scrubbing with a stiff-bristled toilet brush. Then wipe down the toilet seat and handle with disinfectant wipes. The goal? A sparkling white bowl and germ-free toilet seat.

Revive cloudy glasses.

Remove built-up film from hard-water minerals by soaking stemware in white vinegar for five minutes. Then rinse by hand and dry with a microfiber cloth.

 

Must Follow Tips For The Deepest Clean

Though some of us consider ourselves to be “clean” people, there are parts of our homes and spaces that end up being neglected. While lots of us clean regularly, most of us avoid doing a “deep clean” until we have company or there is some sort of special occasion.

Stop trying to reach up high to clean all the little slats in your vent. Remove it completely, wipe it down with a paper towel and toss them into your dishwasher and run them on a short cycle with water only. Dry completely and put them back.

If you want your toilet to truly be clean, you’ll have to clean its siphon. Turn off the water supply to your toilet and flush it until the bowl is empty. Cover your siphons with duct tape and pour vinegar into the toilet tanks and flush. The vinegar will be trapped inside of the siphons. Let it sit overnight and remove the tape and turn the water back on in the morning.

You pillows can get downright nasty after a while. So, you’ll want to put two pillows into your washing machine on the hot cycle with one cup of bleach and regular detergent. Run them through the washing machine with an extra rinse cycle. Place them in the dryer with some tennis balls so they don’t lose their shape.

Cover your sink with a layer of baking soda and scrub with a sponge. Pour some more hydrogen peroxide on your sponge and scrub the sink down again. Let it sit for 20 minutes your rinse your sink off.

 

How to Deep Clean Your House

Whether you’re spring or fall cleaning, or your house has reached the “I just can’t take it any more” level (we’ve all been there), here’s how to give your house a full deep clean. It’s easier than you might think. Start with six basic cleaning steps, then tackle a few room-specific chores, and you’ll have a house that passes any white-glove inspection in almost no time.

Declutter Just a Bit. Find a new place for — or better yet, get rid of — anything that does not belong in the room but is visible. (Save the stuff behind closed doors for another day. You don’t want to get overwhelmed.) Clearing the clutter makes deep cleaning easier, plus seeing those tidy surfaces will give you the oomph to keep going.

Start High, Go Low. Tackle the big, hard-to-reach surfaces in this order: ceiling, ceiling trim, ceiling light fixtures (including bulbs), walls, the rest of the trim, and baseboards. The best tool is a clean microfiber mop or duster with a telescoping handle. (They’re so thin you can get behind the sofa without moving it.) Above eye level, a spritz of water is all you need on the mop. But below, where there is actual dirt plus dust, use warm water mixed with a drop of dish soap. (In bathrooms, add a splash of white vinegar to stop mold.) Where a mop is unwieldy, use a microfiber cloth. Rinse often and wring thoroughly.

Yep, You Do Windows. It’s not that bad, and the payoff is huge. First, vacuum the sills and tracks. Then spritz the window with cleaner from top to bottom. Let the cleaner do its thing for a minute, then squeegee it off. If you wipe in one direction on inside windows and another on outside ones, it will be easier to see and fix streaks.

Spruce Up Those Window Treatments. Save yourself the trouble of taking down blinds or shades. All you really need to do is vacuum them using the brush attachment. And instead of laundering and ironing curtains, just fluff them in the dryer for a few minutes (while you wipe off the rod and rings). Then hang them right back up.

 

Useful Tips For Deep Cleaning This Summer

Believe it or not, the springtime comes with a lot of dust and pollen for your beloved home. Cleaning your house for the wellbeing of your family is crucial. Not only this, but the current lockdown situation has also set the stage for such deep spring-cleaning chores.

Smelling the colorful flowers and hearing the birds chirp is not a treat unless your indoor is as appealing as the outdoor. Cleaning this summer helps to deep cleaning your house and it may sound like a very simple process, but when you are up to it, there is a high chance that you will not end up as a satisfied soul.

Decide the best time for a summer cleaning/ Spring Clean

The weather could be the deciding factor here, but keep an eye on the forecast and pick up a sunny and bright day for starting summer cleaning

You might feel cold and relaxed on a windy day, but the gusty wind would not let you clean properly. So, it is better to have a clam day for that prominent result.

Make a spring clean checklist

Ignoring and forgetting becomes a norm at home, as we all are at ease there. Thus, for keeping up with our deep cleaning plan, you need to do some homework.

 

You Can Spring-Clean Your Entire House In a Day—Here’s How

For those seeking a useful way to spend their time during social distancing—or anyone simply interested in forging a deeper connection with their homes—HB has launched Home Love, a series of daily tips and ideas to make every minute indoors more productive (and gratifying!). We’ll be sharing a new one every day until April 1st.

When the weather starts to warm up, it’s a sign to bust open your windows—and, perhaps less exciting, your cleaning supplies cabinet. And as much as we appreciate the concept of spring cleaning, you’d be well advised to regularly tidy up year-round to prevent the deepest of deep cleans come March. Not sure where to start your spring cleaning project? Use this to-do list, which includes all the spots you’ve most likely been neglecting and instructions on how to tackle them like a pro. Here’s to spring cleaning (or just deep cleaning in summer, fall, or winter) the entire house in one day

Your Cabinets

Over time, build-up can collect on your kitchen cabinets — especially if you don’t run the exhaust hood over your range while you cook to keep grease from settling. To remove, use Parker & Bailey Kitchen Cabinet Cream to cut through the dirt and leave wood moisturized.

Your Windows

Instead of just wiping down the inside, make sure you take to the outdoors with Hope’s Perfect Glass Cleaner during spring cleaning season to remove spots and smudges you don’t usually have time to tackle. Pro tip? Wash them on a cloudy day to ensure that the sun won’t dry the cleanser before you’re done wiping.

Your Countertops

The first step to preventing granite stains: Seal your countertops as soon as they’re installed, says kitchen designer Florence Perchuk. You’ll know they’re sealed properly when water beads and forms droplets on the surface. To maintain, have them sealed again a year later and make sure you wipe up accidental spills as soon as they happen.